Asus ROG Phone review: Too much gamer in one phone

Posted on Thursday March 21, 2019
Asus ROG Phone review: Too much gamer in one phone

The ROG Phone from Asus is another ‘gaming’ phone focusing on a high-refresh-rate screen, RGB lighting, and custom-cooled components. Asus has also given the ROG Phone a couple of hardware and software tricks that improve the gaming experience.

Unlike the similarly gaming-oriented Razer Phone 2, however, Asus has designed the ROG Phone to scream, ‘I’M A GAMER’ in its aesthethics and software choices, which really turns me off. The ROG Phone ends up feeling like a polarizing experience and not my first choice for a gaming phone.

The best gaming hardware?

You might have heard that Asus picked the “world’s fastest speed-binned” Snapdragon 845 chips for the ROG Phone. Spoiler alert: That means absolutely nothing in day-to-day use. I’ve never felt like any flagship phone released within the past year had a problem running the most intensive games or computational loads, and the ROG Phone is no different. But if you’re the type of person who needs the absolute best parts in your phone, then the ROG Phone checks that box. 

To read this article in full, please click here

Watch The Full Nerd talk RTX on GTX and Intel news live!

Posted on Thursday March 21, 2019
Watch The Full Nerd talk RTX on GTX and Intel news live!

Join The Full Nerd gang as they talk about the latest PC hardware topics. In today's show the crew covers Nvidia's announcement of ray tracing on GTX cards, Intel's discreet graphics ambitions, and Comet Lake rumors! As always we will be answering your live questions so speak up in the chat.

If YouTube is not your thing you can also watch us on Twitch, Facebook, and Twitter.

To read this article in full, please click here

Facebook passwords for hundreds of millions of users were exposed to Facebook employees

Posted on Thursday March 21, 2019
Facebook passwords for hundreds of millions of users were exposed to Facebook employees

Facebook confirmed Thursday that hundreds of millions of user passwords were being stored in a “readable format” within its servers, accessible to internal Facebook employees. Affected users will be notified, Facebook said, so they can change those passwords.

Interestingly, Facebook downplayed and confirmed the problem in the same post, filed Thursday, after researcher Brian Krebs issued his own report.  Facebook’s Pedro Canahuati, vice president of engineering for security and privacy, initially referred to “some” user passwords that were accessible to Facebook employees. A paragraph later, he revealed that “hundreds of millions of Facebook Lite users, millions of Facebook users, and tens of thousands of Instagram users” would be notified.

To read this article in full, please click here

 

Read More...